Opinion

EDITOR’S NEWSLETTER: The Mess of Returning

By Elizabeth Scalzo

Editor-in-Chief

How are we on week four of the semester already? 

I don’t know about you, but all of my days are fading together and my to-do list is about three pages long. 

My conclusion is that we weren’t prepared to come back to campus, and by “we,” I don’t mean just students. Faculty and staff seem to be just as exhausted by the return to in-person.

Instead of campus moving fast-paced and upbeat, people are running around like chickens with their heads cut off, at least that’s how I feel, but why is this? 

Pondering this question led to a number of answers:

  • Burnout from all of the time spent staring at screens during Zoom university and not recovering
  • Having less involvement on campus because two classes have graduated and the sophomores and freshman both are not acclimated to in-person operations yet
  • Not taking time for mental health breaks creating a cycle of being tired and relying on caffeine
  • Poor sleep schedules
  • Not eating on a regular schedule because of varying class times
  • Not managing time in an effective way

I’m sure there are many other reasons why the campus community is feeling this zombie-like movement in their day-to-day, but I’m more focused on how we work on these problems so that we aren’t all dealing with a case of burnout by the time winter break comes.

Make sure you utilize Student Counseling and Psychological Services; even if it is going to an event to help you destress, it could make all the difference. 

Know when your social battery is low and take a break from socializing. When we’re on campus it is hard to have real time by yourself, so be mindful of how you are spending your time.

The Equinox has exciting news! Our first print edition of the semester will be coming out on Oct. 1, many stories to come online in the meantime.


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Burnout will creep up on the campus community if we’re not careful.

Art by Elizabeth Scalzo.

Categories: Opinion

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